Temple of Hercules

„I was a young man when the Plague came—twenty-seven years old; and I lived on the other side of San Francisco Bay, in Berkeley. You remember those great stone houses, Edwin, when we came down the hills from Contra Costa? That was where I lived, in those stone houses. I was a professor of English literature.“

Much of this was over the heads of the boys, but they strove to comprehend dimly this tale of the past.

„What was them stone houses for?“ Hare-Lip queried.

„You remember when your dad taught you to swim?“ The boy nodded. „Well, in the University of California—that is the name we had for the houses—we taught young men and women how to think, just as I have taught you now, by sand and pebbles and shells, to know how many people lived in those days. There was very much to teach. The young men and women we taught were called students. We had large rooms in which we taught. I talked to them, forty or fifty at a time, just as I am talking to you now. I told them about the books other men had written before their time, and even, sometimes, in their time—“

„Was that all you did?—just talk, talk, talk?“ Hoo-Hoo demanded. „Who hunted your meat for you? and milked the goats? and caught the fish?“

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